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Tag: medical conditions

Postpartum depression: What to do when the baby blues don’t go away

Becoming a mother is an exciting transition that changes you in unexpected ways and gives you a new perspective on life. It’s a time of joy, but many new moms experience intense mood swings after giving birth. One minute you feel happy, only to break down crying the next. The baby blues are a normal part of early motherhood and usually go away within a few weeks of your delivery. But if your symptoms persist and begin to affect your quality of life, you may have postpartum depression.

How to soothe a sore throat: Home remedies that actually work

When you have a sore throat, you may experience mild discomfort or a burning sensation when you swallow or talk, and the back of your throat may feel irritated or scratchy. Sore throats can be caused by anything from allergies and the common cold to bacterial infections like strep throat and other conditions. In many cases, simple home remedies can help ease your pain.

Recommended vaccines for children from birth through age six

A child’s immune system is exposed to numerous germs every day. While babies are born with antibodies that offer protection against some diseases, the protection is temporary. Vaccines given from birth to age six help protect kids from viruses and bacteria that cause serious diseases. Many of these diseases are uncommon in the United States because vaccines are doing their job. During well-child visits, talk to your pediatrician about the recommended immunizations for children.

Fibromyalgia: A practical guide to treating pain, fatigue, and brain fog

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that causes pain in the muscles and joints throughout the body. While researchers don’t know what causes fibromyalgia, it’s a real health condition that affects at least four million adults in the United States. There is no test to diagnose it—and no cure—but your doctor can help you find treatments to manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life.

Irritable bowel syndrome: Symptoms of IBS, foods to avoid, and treatment options

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects 25 to 45 million people in the U.S. IBS can cause uncomfortable symptoms, including abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, cramps, excessive gas, and bloating. It can also change how often you have a bowel movement and the appearance of your stool. Fortunately, if you suffer from IBS, you can often manage your symptoms through dietary and lifestyle changes.

Long COVID: How to protect yourself from the long-term effects of COVID-19

Most people who get COVID-19 recover completely within a few days to several weeks. However, about one in 20 people infected with COVID-19 experience long-term symptoms that can last up to 18 months or even years after the initial infection. Anyone who was infected with the virus that causes the disease can continue to experience symptoms, including shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue, and brain fog. In fact, millions of so-called COVID long-haulers suffer from the condition.

Reduce your risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, often find it difficult to breathe while doing everyday activities. The condition can make it feel like you’re running out of air even when you take a deep breath, and you may have a cough that won’t go away. Early detection of COPD can change its progress, so be sure to see your doctor if you have signs of this chronic lung disease.

Seasonal affective disorder: Ways to ease seasonal depression

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression triggered by changing seasons. Most people with SAD begin to experience symptoms during the fall as the weather turns colder and the days grow shorter. The condition may worsen throughout the winter before ending in the spring. SAD is not simply a case of the “winter blues.” Rather, it’s a form of depression that affects your daily life and changes the way you think and feel. Fortunately, many treatment options are available.

Preventing back pain: Tips for a healthy back

Back pain is one of the most common medical problems in the U.S. In fact, 80 percent of Americans will experience back pain at some point in life, and it affects men and women equally. Sometimes back pain is sharp and intense, caused by heavy lifting or an accident, and heals in a short period of time. Other times back pain is a dull, constant ache that prevents people from going to work and spending time with family and friends. Fortunately, there are ways to find relief from back pain.

Healthy bones: What you need to know about osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes bones to become more porous, fragile, and prone to fracture as you age. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, some 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and 44 million have low bone density, increasing their risk of breaking a bone. For those with osteoporosis, the most common fractures occur in the hip, spine, and wrist. The good news is that osteoporosis is manageable. Simple diet and lifestyle changes can help slow the loss of bone mass and help prevent fractures.

Exercising with arthritis: Managing osteoarthritis pain with physical activity

Arthritis is a disease that can affect any joint in the body, especially your knees, hips, lower back, neck, fingers, and toes. While there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, about 27 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis (OA)—or “wear and tear” arthritis—the most common form of the condition. Arthritis can’t be reversed, but physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight can slow its progression, reduce pain, and help improve joint function.

Heart disease in women: Take steps to reduce your risk factors

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. In fact, according to the American Heart Association, heart disease—also known as cardiovascular disease—and stroke cause 1 in 3 women’s deaths each year, claiming the life of approximately one woman every 80 seconds. It’s the most common cause of death for men, too, but some of the symptoms and warning signs of heart disease differ between men and women. And, it doesn’t affect all women alike. Fortunately, as a woman, you can take steps to understand the symptoms and reduce your risk of heart disease.