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Topic: Health Topics

5 natural ways to lower your blood pressure

One in three adults in the U.S. has high blood pressure, but only about half have it under control. High blood pressure—or hypertension—can damage your blood vessels and lead to serious health problems, including kidney failure. It also increases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. The good news is that if you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you may be able to lower it naturally, without medication. It’s as simple as making five lifestyle changes.

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Preventing back pain: Tips for a healthy back

Back pain is one of the most common medical problems in the U.S. In fact, 80 percent of Americans will experience back pain at some point in life, and it affects men and women equally. Sometimes back pain is sharp and intense, caused by heavy lifting or an accident, and heals in a short period of time. Other times back pain is a dull, constant ache that prevents people from going to work and spending time with family and friends. Fortunately, there are ways to find relief from back pain.

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Healthy bones: What you need to know about osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes bones to become more porous, fragile, and prone to fracture as you age. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, some 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and 44 million have low bone density, increasing their risk of breaking a bone. For those with osteoporosis, the most common fractures occur in the hip, spine, and wrist. The good news is that osteoporosis is manageable. Simple diet and lifestyle changes can help slow the loss of bone mass and help prevent fractures.

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Prostate cancer screening for men: Should you get a PSA test?

For men, the decision to get a prostate cancer screening is personal and complex. Medical organizations offer different recommendations regarding prostate cancer screenings. And, unlike other types of cancer, not all prostate cancers need treatment. Some men may find that the potential risks of screenings outweigh the benefits. Only you and your doctor can decide whether or not prostate cancer screening is right for you.

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Breast cancer screenings for women: A guide to mammograms

Screening mammograms use low-dose X-rays to find breast cancer early, before it causes any warning signs. These tests are important for women because treatment is more likely to be successful the sooner breast cancer is detected. The chances of survival are higher, too. While national health organizations offer different breast cancer screening guidelines, everyone agrees that women should discuss the benefits and risks of mammograms with their doctors and decide together when to begin screenings and how often to repeat them.

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Exercising with arthritis: Managing osteoarthritis pain with physical activity

Arthritis is a disease that can affect any joint in the body, especially your knees, hips, lower back, neck, fingers, and toes. While there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, about 27 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis (OA)—or “wear and tear” arthritis—the most common form of the condition. Arthritis can’t be reversed, but physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight can slow its progression, reduce pain, and help improve joint function.

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Healthy ways to relieve stress

From time to time, everyone experiences stress. It’s a natural reaction to situations where you feel threatened or anxious. Your body responds to stress by releasing hormones that raise your heart rate, change the way you breathe, and prepare your muscles to respond. Learning how to manage stress is an important part of taking care of yourself and maintaining good overall mental and physical health.

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Colorectal cancer screening tests: Colonoscopy vs. Cologuard

Turning 50 involves a rite of passage most of us avoid talking about: the dreaded colonoscopy. As a widely used exam that detects changes and abnormalities in the large intestine and rectum, colonoscopies get a bad rap, but screenings for colorectal cancer can save lives. The good news for newly minted quinquagenarians (people ages 50 to 59) is that now you may be able to take an at-home colon cancer test called Cologuard® instead of getting a colonoscopy, as long as you meet a few requirements.

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Heart disease in women: Take steps to reduce your risk factors

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. In fact, according to the American Heart Association, heart disease—also known as cardiovascular disease—and stroke cause 1 in 3 women’s deaths each year, claiming the life of approximately one woman every 80 seconds. It’s the most common cause of death for men, too, but some of the symptoms and warning signs of heart disease differ between men and women. And, it doesn’t affect all women alike. Fortunately, as a woman, you can take steps to understand the symptoms and reduce your risk of heart disease.

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