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Deductibles, copays, and coinsurance: Understanding the out-of-pocket costs of health insurance

Health insurance can be confusing. It isn’t always easy to understand the different costs that may be part of your health plan. Premiums, deductibles, copays, coinsurance, out-of-pocket maximums—if you’re not really sure what these terms mean, you’re not alone. Educating yourself about how health insurance works can help you plan ahead, calculate how much you may need to pay for your health care, and make the most of your health plan.

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Well-child visits: Keep your kids healthy with regular checkups

Preventive health care can help us stay healthy. That’s why doctors recommend annual physicals for adults. Pediatricians recommend well-child checkups for kids and teens because prevention is particularly important for young people. Regular exams and tests are an effective way to track your child’s health and development. And, catching health issues early can increase the chances of finding a treatment or a cure.

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Lose belly fat: 10 tips for a flatter stomach

When somebody tells you there’s a fast, easy way to get rid of stubborn belly fat, they’re probably trying to sell you something. It’s tempting to believe in fat-burning miracle foods and secret exercises that will flatten your stomach in a matter of days. But there’s no magic formula for trimming your midsection. You can lose belly fat—and keep it off for good—by staying committed to your goals and following a few commonsense tips.

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Breast cancer screenings for women: A guide to mammograms

Screening mammograms use low-dose X-rays to find breast cancer early, before it causes any warning signs. These tests are important for women because treatment is more likely to be successful the sooner breast cancer is detected. The chances of survival are higher, too. While national health organizations offer different breast cancer screening guidelines, everyone agrees that women should discuss the benefits and risks of mammograms with their doctors and decide together when to begin screenings and how often to repeat them.

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Exercising with arthritis: Managing osteoarthritis pain with physical activity

Arthritis is a disease that can affect any joint in the body, especially your knees, hips, lower back, neck, fingers, and toes. While there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, about 27 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis (OA)—or “wear and tear” arthritis—the most common form of the condition. Arthritis can’t be reversed, but physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight can slow its progression, reduce pain, and help improve joint function.

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Healthy ways to relieve stress

From time to time, everyone experiences stress. It’s a natural reaction to situations where you feel threatened or anxious. Your body responds to stress by releasing hormones that raise your heart rate, change the way you breathe, and prepare your muscles to respond. Learning how to manage stress is an important part of taking care of yourself and maintaining good overall mental and physical health.

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Colorectal cancer screening tests: Colonoscopy vs. Cologuard

Turning 50 involves a rite of passage most of us avoid talking about: the dreaded colonoscopy. As a widely used exam that detects changes and abnormalities in the large intestine and rectum, colonoscopies get a bad rap, but screenings for colorectal cancer can save lives. The good news for newly minted quinquagenarians (people ages 50 to 59) is that now you may be able to take an at-home colon cancer test called Cologuard® instead of getting a colonoscopy, as long as you meet a few requirements.

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Fitting in fitness: Sneaky ways to make time for exercise

The health benefits of exercise are endless. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, physical activity is one of the most important things you can do to improve your health. It can help prevent cancer and decrease your risk of everything from heart disease and stroke to high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, depression, and even dementia. And that’s just the beginning.

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