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Health and Wellness Blog

Should you take statins for high cholesterol?

If you have high cholesterol or an elevated risk of developing heart disease, your doctor may prescribe a statin. These life-saving medications can reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke and are often the most reliable way to treat high LDL (or bad) cholesterol. As with any drug, statins may have side effects, including headaches, nausea, and muscle aches, but for the vast majority of high-risk patients, the benefits outweigh the risks.

12 ways to exercise without going to the gym

Physical activity is good for your body and mind, but it’s hard to find time to exercise when you’re busy. And not everyone likes to go to the gym. As a result, less than a quarter of U.S. adults get the exercise they need. If you’re trying to be more active, it’s time to change the way you think about what qualifies as exercise. Here are some tips to help you get fit without setting foot on a treadmill or picking up a dumbbell.

Postpartum depression: What to do when the baby blues don’t go away

Becoming a mother is an exciting transition that changes you in unexpected ways and gives you a new perspective on life. It’s a time of joy, but many new moms experience intense mood swings after giving birth. One minute you feel happy, only to break down crying the next. The baby blues are a normal part of early motherhood and usually go away within a few weeks of your delivery. But if your symptoms persist and begin to affect your quality of life, you may have postpartum depression.

How to soothe a sore throat: Home remedies that actually work

When you have a sore throat, you may experience mild discomfort or a burning sensation when you swallow or talk, and the back of your throat may feel irritated or scratchy. Sore throats can be caused by anything from allergies and the common cold to bacterial infections like strep throat and other conditions. In many cases, simple home remedies can help ease your pain.

Can healthy habits reduce your risk of depression?

Many factors play a role in the risk of developing depression. Although we can’t change our genetics, making healthy lifestyle choices can have a positive effect on both our physical and mental well-being. In fact, lifestyle may play a more significant role than genetic risk factors for depression. Researchers have identified seven healthy lifestyle habits that can help protect your long-term mental health and well-being.

Processed foods to avoid for your health

No one expects you to eat a healthy diet 100 percent of the time, but ultra-processed foods like fried chicken, potato chips, and pastries can cause spikes in your blood-sugar levels and lead to weight gain and an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. While these foods appeal to our eyes and taste good, they offer little nutritional value. Incorporating more nutritious, wholesome foods into your meals can help you feel more energetic throughout the day and lower your risk for chronic diseases.

Recommended vaccines for children from birth through age six

A child’s immune system is exposed to numerous germs every day. While babies are born with antibodies that offer protection against some diseases, the protection is temporary. Vaccines given from birth to age six help protect kids from viruses and bacteria that cause serious diseases. Many of these diseases are uncommon in the United States because vaccines are doing their job. During well-child visits, talk to your pediatrician about the recommended immunizations for children.

How much exercise do you need to stay healthy?

Regular physical activity is part of a healthy lifestyle. However, only about one in five adults in the U.S. gets enough exercise to be healthy. Being inactive and sitting too much raises your risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. The good news is that even small amounts of physical activity can help improve your health. Whether you’re looking to reduce your risks of chronic medical conditions or improve your quality of life, making regular physical activity part of your lifestyle can help you achieve your health goals.

Fibromyalgia: A practical guide to treating pain, fatigue, and brain fog

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that causes pain in the muscles and joints throughout the body. While researchers don’t know what causes fibromyalgia, it’s a real health condition that affects at least four million adults in the United States. There is no test to diagnose it—and no cure—but your doctor can help you find treatments to manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life.

6 reasons to get an annual checkup

Annual checkups are essential to your ongoing health. Even if you feel well, it’s important to schedule an appointment with your primary care doctor once a year. If your doctor gets to know you when you’re healthy, you are more likely to receive better care if you get sick. A checkup, sometimes called a physical exam, is also the perfect time to ask questions about your health and discuss changes you can make for a healthier lifestyle. Here are six reasons to schedule your annual checkup today.

7 relaxation techniques to reduce stress

Stress is an unavoidable part of life. Over time, chronic stress can increase your risk of developing high blood pressure, weaken your immune system, and harm both your physical and mental health. While you may be tempted to binge-watch TV or scroll through social media on your phone at the end of a long day, staring at a screen does little to reduce the damaging effects of stress on your mind and body. Practicing relaxation techniques is a much healthier and more effective way to reduce stress.

Irritable bowel syndrome: Symptoms of IBS, foods to avoid, and treatment options

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects 25 to 45 million people in the U.S. IBS can cause uncomfortable symptoms, including abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, cramps, excessive gas, and bloating. It can also change how often you have a bowel movement and the appearance of your stool. Fortunately, if you suffer from IBS, you can often manage your symptoms through dietary and lifestyle changes.

10 high-protein, low-calorie snacks that keep you full

Choosing healthy, protein-rich snacks can keep you feeling full for longer and prevent you from overeating between meals. When your stomach starts to complain, it’s easy to reach for a granola bar or a bag of corn chips, but processed, low-nutrient snacks can cause your insulin and blood sugar levels to fluctuate, which makes you hungrier. Choosing nutrient-rich, high-protein foods is the smarter way to snack.

7 ways to lower your healthcare costs

As the cost of healthcare continues to rise, it’s important to learn what your health plan covers and take steps to limit your out-of-pocket expenses. The healthcare system can be complex and difficult to navigate, but as a smart consumer you can find significant savings if you know where to look—and if you play an active role in making the most of your benefits. Here are seven ways to save on healthcare.

Acupuncture: What it is, how it works, and who can benefit from the treatment

Acupuncture is a form of medicine that originated in China and has been practiced for thousands of years. The procedure first came to the United States in the early 1970s, and its popularity has been growing ever since. Still, there are a lot of misconceptions about acupuncture, and many people in the West wonder if acupuncture is based in science or if it really works. Here are some answers to the most common questions about acupuncture.

Long COVID: How to protect yourself from the long-term effects of COVID-19

Most people who get COVID-19 recover completely within a few days to several weeks. However, about one in 20 people infected with COVID-19 experience long-term symptoms that can last up to 18 months or even years after the initial infection. Anyone who was infected with the virus that causes the disease can continue to experience symptoms, including shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue, and brain fog. In fact, millions of so-called COVID long-haulers suffer from the condition.

High-fiber diets: Easy ways to get the fiber you need

Dietary fiber can improve digestive health and bowel function, and eating foods high in fiber can lower your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Fiber also helps lower cholesterol and regulate blood sugar levels, and because it keeps you feeling full, a high-fiber diet can help you to lose weight. Despite the many health benefits, most Americans don’t eat enough fiber. Here are some tips for adding more fiber to your diet.

9 health benefits of strength training

Strength training is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. As we age, lean muscle mass diminishes, while body fat rises. Strength training can help you build muscle, reduce body fat, and burn calories more efficiently. An exercise routine that combines cardiovascular activities, such as walking or swimming, with strength training can enhance both your physical and mental well-being.

Get the most from your pharmacy benefits

Your pharmacist is an important member of your healthcare team. In addition to teaching you how to use prescription and over-the-counter medicines safely and effectively, your pharmacist can help you avoid harmful interactions with other medications, supplements, food, and beverages. Here are some tips to help you get the most out of your pharmacy benefits.

9 healthy eating tips for busy people

Healthy eating is challenging when you’re busy. It requires preparation and planning, but maintaining healthy eating habits is easier than you may think—and the rewards are well worth it. Eating a nutritious diet can help improve your health, boost your energy and immune system, reduce stress, and protect your overall well-being. If work and other responsibilities keep you busy, following nine simple tips can help you create a healthy eating plan that fits your hectic schedule.

Reduce your risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, often find it difficult to breathe while doing everyday activities. The condition can make it feel like you’re running out of air even when you take a deep breath, and you may have a cough that won’t go away. Early detection of COPD can change its progress, so be sure to see your doctor if you have signs of this chronic lung disease.

Treatment cost advisor tools: Estimate expenses before you choose care

When you make a purchase, whether you’re buying a gallon of milk or a new car, you know what something costs before you buy it. But understanding the cost of healthcare up front isn’t as easy. Too often, you don’t know how much healthcare costs until you receive a bill from a provider or a statement from your health plan. Fortunately, most health plans offer treatment cost estimators and other tools that help you calculate your costs before you receive medical care.

A beginner’s guide to starting behavioral therapy

While many people are reluctant to start seeing a therapist, therapy can be an effective treatment for a wide range of mental and emotional issues. From relationship problems and job stress to anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), phobias, and more, a therapist can help you get to the source of your problems, overcome emotional challenges, and make positive changes in your life. Here are some tips on finding a therapist and getting the most out of your therapy sessions.

7 healthy New Year’s resolutions you can actually keep

The beginning of a new year is a great time to make healthy lifestyle changes, give up bad habits, and improve your well-being. It’s no wonder that many Americans celebrate the New Year by resolving to get healthier. The most popular New Year’s resolutions include getting more exercise, losing weight, and eating a healthier diet. While only a small percentage of people actually keep their resolutions, here are some steps you can take to get healthier in the year ahead and achieve your health goals.

Seasonal affective disorder: Ways to ease seasonal depression

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression triggered by changing seasons. Most people with SAD begin to experience symptoms during the fall as the weather turns colder and the days grow shorter. The condition may worsen throughout the winter before ending in the spring. SAD is not simply a case of the “winter blues.” Rather, it’s a form of depression that affects your daily life and changes the way you think and feel. Fortunately, many treatment options are available.

A guide to getting the most from your health benefits

Health insurance provides essential benefits that help you maintain your health and well-being, access care for accidents and illnesses, and protect you from unexpected medical costs. If you’re not sure how your health plan works or what it covers, you may not be maximizing the benefits available to you—and you could end up paying more for healthcare. Here are some tips to help you get the most from your health plan.

10 tips to help you lose weight

When you’re trying to lose weight, it’s natural to want to shed pounds quickly. While fad diets and rapid weight loss plans can help you lose weight fast, you’re unlikely to keep it off for the long haul. Losing weight gradually is the healthiest and most effective way to get to and maintain a healthy weight. Making permanent lifestyle changes will help ensure you don’t gain back the weight you’ve lost.

5 tips for a safe and healthy summertime

Summer is filled with fun outdoor activities that make the most of the long, lazy days and warm weather. Whether you’re heading to the beach, enjoying a picnic in a park, going fishing, or taking the kids on a bike ride, stay safe and healthy with our summer safety tips for the whole family.

How to quit smoking: 5 tips to help you resist tobacco cravings

Smoking harms nearly every organ in the body and is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Smokeless tobacco causes cancer of the mouth and can lead to nicotine addiction. If you use tobacco, you know you should quit. In fact, most adults who smoke cigarettes want to quit. And most adults who smoked cigarettes in the past have successfully quit. If you’ve tried quitting but started smoking or chewing tobacco again, a solid plan can improve your chances of quitting for good.

Virtual visits: Preparing for your telehealth appointment

Virtual visits offer convenient access to health care 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Rather than scheduling an in-person appointment at a doctor’s office, you can video chat or speak with a provider using a smartphone, computer, or tablet. It’s a great way to get the care you need for minor health conditions without leaving home. Following a few tips will help you get the most from your telehealth visits.

The mental health benefits of exercise: How physical activity can ease the symptoms of depression and anxiety

Exercise is good for your body. It can help you maintain a healthy weight and decrease your risk of developing cancer, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes. But exercise is also good for your mental health. It can reduce tension and stress, improve your concentration, and stabilize your mood. People who exercise feel more energetic throughout the day and sleep better at night. But did you know that regular physical activity can also help you manage depression and anxiety?

6 ways to eat well on a tight budget

Eating a healthy diet is essential for your physical health and emotional wellbeing. When you’re living on a tight budget, finding nutritious, affordable food can be a challenge. While fast food may be tasty and filling, it also tends to be loaded with calories, saturated fat, and added sugars. And despite what some may think, fast food is rarely cheaper than eating healthy, home-cooked meals. Fortunately, there are easy steps you can take to can enjoy healthy food without breaking the bank.

Avoid the holiday blues with tips to help you manage stress and anxiety

Many people consider the holidays to be the most wonderful time of the year, but for some the added stress of the season may cause feelings of anxiety and depression. Different things can trigger the holiday blues—unrealistic expectations, sentimental memories, the inability to be with friends or family. Planning ahead and taking care of yourself can help you minimize stress and find peace and joy during the holiday season.

Cervical cancer screenings: Early detection may lead to successful treatment

Cervical cancer occurs in the cells of the cervix, the lower part of the uterus. Screening tests can find cervical cancer early, when treatment tends to be more successful. Screenings can also detect abnormal cells that may be pre-cancers, so they can be treated before the cells turn into cervical cancer. The most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to have regular screenings starting at age 21.

Creative ways to add more fruits and veggies to your diet

The best way to get all of the nutrients you need each day is to brighten your plate with fruits and vegetables. Eating a rainbow of colorful foods adds flavor and texture to your meals, along with vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in calories and contain essential nutrients that can help prevent heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses. If fruits and veggies aren’t your thing, you can still sneak them into your meals.

Exercising at home: Easy exercises for couch potatoes

Many of us spend a lot of time each day sitting in front of a screen. Sitting for long periods of time can take a toll on your health, especially if you sit for more than eight hours a day with little or no physical activity. Fortunately, moderate exercise can counter the negative health effects of too much sitting. That’s why it’s important for people of all ages and abilities to be as active as possible—no gym membership required.

Screen time: How much is too much?

Screens are everywhere these days. From apps and video games to TV, video conferences, and online classes, screen time adds up. More than ever, we connect to the outside world through screens. As a result, managing screen use—for children and adults—can be a challenge. Too much screen time can increase the risk of obesity, interfere with sleep, and prevent the development of healthy relationships. That’s why it’s important to find a healthy balance between screen time and offline time away from the digital world.

9 tips for better sleep: What to do when insomnia keeps you up at night

Good quality sleep plays an important role in your physical and mental health. It also boosts your immune system and promotes emotional wellness by giving your mind time to rest and recharge. Stress and anxiety can make it more difficult to get a good night’s sleep. If you already suffer from insomnia, experiencing stressful situations can make it worse. At the same time, lack of sleep can make you feel anxious and tense. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to help you get the sleep you need.

Beat anxiety: What to eat to reduce anxiety and stress

Anxiety is a normal part of life. From time to time, we all feel nervous or worry about certain situations, but anxiety can be a problem if it interferes with daily activities or makes it hard for you to enjoy life. Anxiety disorders are quite common. In fact, in the United States, at least 40 million adults struggle with anxiety. While the condition is often treated with therapy and medications, watching what you eat can help reduce anxiety and stress and improve your mood.

10 ways to stop viruses from spreading and avoid getting sick

Viruses are spread in many different ways, including through close contact between people and through droplets in the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Some viruses can live on surfaces for 24 hours or longer. We can accidentally spread these infectious agents by touching doorknobs, railings, mobile devices, surfaces, and other items. Fortunately, there are simple steps you can take to prevent the spread of viruses and avoid contagious diseases.

Healthy pregnancy: Why prenatal care is so important

Whether you’re a first-time mom or already have kids, the health care you receive when you’re pregnant is an important part of a healthy pregnancy for you and your baby. Regular prenatal visits throughout your pregnancy can help catch potential issues early and reduce the risk of complications. These checkups also give you a chance to learn how to manage any discomfort you’re experiencing and ask questions about your pregnancy and the birth of your baby.

5 natural ways to lower your blood pressure

One in three adults in the U.S. has high blood pressure, but only about half have it under control. High blood pressure—or hypertension—can damage your blood vessels and lead to serious health problems, including kidney failure. It also increases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. The good news is that if you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you may be able to lower it naturally, without medication. It’s as simple as making five lifestyle changes.

Preventing back pain: Tips for a healthy back

Back pain is one of the most common medical problems in the U.S. In fact, 80 percent of Americans will experience back pain at some point in life, and it affects men and women equally. Sometimes back pain is sharp and intense, caused by heavy lifting or an accident, and heals in a short period of time. Other times back pain is a dull, constant ache that prevents people from going to work and spending time with family and friends. Fortunately, there are ways to find relief from back pain.

Healthy bones: What you need to know about osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes bones to become more porous, fragile, and prone to fracture as you age. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, some 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and 44 million have low bone density, increasing their risk of breaking a bone. For those with osteoporosis, the most common fractures occur in the hip, spine, and wrist. The good news is that osteoporosis is manageable. Simple diet and lifestyle changes can help slow the loss of bone mass and help prevent fractures.

Prostate cancer screening for men: Should you get a PSA test?

For men, the decision to get a prostate cancer screening is personal and complex. Medical organizations offer different recommendations regarding prostate cancer screenings. And, unlike other types of cancer, not all prostate cancers need treatment. Some men may find that the potential risks of screenings outweigh the benefits. Only you and your doctor can decide whether or not prostate cancer screening is right for you.

Deductibles, copays, and coinsurance: Understanding the out-of-pocket costs of health insurance

Health insurance can be confusing. It isn’t always easy to understand the different costs that may be part of your health plan. Premiums, deductibles, copays, coinsurance, out-of-pocket maximums—if you’re not really sure what these terms mean, you’re not alone. Educating yourself about how health insurance works can help you plan ahead, calculate how much you may need to pay for your health care, and make the most of your health plan.

Well-child visits: Keep your kids healthy with regular checkups

Preventive health care can help us stay healthy. That’s why doctors recommend annual physicals for adults. Pediatricians recommend well-child checkups for kids and teens because prevention is particularly important for young people. Regular exams and tests are an effective way to track your child’s health and development. And, catching health issues early can increase the chances of finding a treatment or a cure.

Lose belly fat: 10 tips for a flatter stomach

When somebody tells you there’s a fast, easy way to get rid of stubborn belly fat, they’re probably trying to sell you something. It’s tempting to believe in fat-burning miracle foods and secret exercises that will flatten your stomach in a matter of days. But there’s no magic formula for trimming your midsection. You can lose belly fat—and keep it off for good—by staying committed to your goals and following a few commonsense tips.

Breast cancer screenings for women: A guide to mammograms

Screening mammograms use low-dose X-rays to find breast cancer early, before it causes any warning signs. These tests are important for women because treatment is more likely to be successful the sooner breast cancer is detected. The chances of survival are higher, too. While national health organizations offer different breast cancer screening guidelines, everyone agrees that women should discuss the benefits and risks of mammograms with their doctors and decide together when to begin screenings and how often to repeat them.

Exercising with arthritis: Managing osteoarthritis pain with physical activity

Arthritis is a disease that can affect any joint in the body, especially your knees, hips, lower back, neck, fingers, and toes. While there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, about 27 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis (OA)—or “wear and tear” arthritis—the most common form of the condition. Arthritis can’t be reversed, but physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight can slow its progression, reduce pain, and help improve joint function.

Healthy ways to relieve stress

From time to time, everyone experiences stress. It’s a natural reaction to situations where you feel threatened or anxious. Your body responds to stress by releasing hormones that raise your heart rate, change the way you breathe, and prepare your muscles to respond. Learning how to manage stress is an important part of taking care of yourself and maintaining good overall mental and physical health.

Colorectal cancer screening tests: Colonoscopy vs. Cologuard

Turning 50 involves a rite of passage most of us avoid talking about: the dreaded colonoscopy. As a widely used exam that detects changes and abnormalities in the large intestine and rectum, colonoscopies get a bad rap, but screenings for colorectal cancer can save lives. The good news for newly minted quinquagenarians (people ages 50 to 59) is that now you may be able to take an at-home colon cancer test called Cologuard® instead of getting a colonoscopy, as long as you meet a few requirements.

Fitting in fitness: Sneaky ways to make time for exercise

The health benefits of exercise are endless. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, physical activity is one of the most important things you can do to improve your health. It can help prevent cancer and decrease your risk of everything from heart disease and stroke to high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, depression, and even dementia. And that’s just the beginning.

Flu shots 101: What you need to know

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory infection that circulates around the world each year and usually hits the United States between October and May. The viruses that cause the flu are most often spread by coughing, sneezing, or close contact.

Anyone can get the flu. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it tends to strike suddenly and can last for several days. Although it has some of the same symptoms as the common cold—a runny or stuffy nose, cough, sore throat, and fatigue—the flu can lead to pneumonia, blood infections, or even death. Other symptoms of the flu include fever, body aches, headache, and chills.

Heart disease in women: Take steps to reduce your risk factors

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. In fact, according to the American Heart Association, heart disease—also known as cardiovascular disease—and stroke cause 1 in 3 women’s deaths each year, claiming the life of approximately one woman every 80 seconds. It’s the most common cause of death for men, too, but some of the symptoms and warning signs of heart disease differ between men and women. And, it doesn’t affect all women alike. Fortunately, as a woman, you can take steps to understand the symptoms and reduce your risk of heart disease.

What you need to know about opioids

Opioids are drugs that relieve pain. Prescription opioids are medications that doctors use to treat moderate to severe pain after surgery or injury or for health conditions like cancer. Common prescription opioids include oxycodone (OxyContin®), hydrocodone (Vicodin®), morphine, and methadone. Other types of opioids include fentanyl, a synthetic opioid pain reliever, and heroin, an illegal drug.

Healthy snacks you can eat without gaining weight

Snacking gets a bad rap, but it can actually help you maintain a healthy weight—and even lose weight—as long as you pay attention to the types of foods you snack on and make smart choices. Eating smaller meals and snacks about every three hours or so can help maintain more stable blood sugar levels throughout the day. And, it can help you avoid extreme hunger so you don’t overeat at lunch or dinner.

Where to go for medical care

It isn’t always easy to know what to do, especially when symptoms come on suddenly, but knowing where to go for medical care is a key part of being an informed health care consumer. Before you wait for hours in the ER and end up with an exorbitant hospital bill, take a few moments to consider your options. It could save you time, money, and a lot of frustration.

Is walking good exercise?

Walking is one of the easiest ways to exercise. You can do it almost anywhere—including parks, shopping malls, or in your own neighborhood—and you don’t need to invest in a lot of special equipment. Best of all, walking can help you achieve your fitness and weight-loss goals.

Preventive care can help you stay healthy

Preventive health care includes services like doctor checkups and routine screenings that can help prevent diseases and other health problems. Taking advantage of your preventive care benefits can help you stay healthy and discover a health issue before it becomes a serious problem. Treatment is often more effective when an illness is detected early.

How to start exercising when you’re overweight

Exercising regularly can be an effective way to lose weight and keep your weight under control. But starting a new workout routine when you’re overweight can be hard, especially if you haven’t been active for a while. Focusing on the benefits of exercise can help motivate you to get started and keep going. Of course, always talk with your doctor before you start any exercise program.

Tips to reduce your risk of melanoma and protect your skin

Cancer starts when cells in the body begin to grow out of control. Melanoma is a cancer that usually begins in skin cells. According to the American Cancer Society, melanoma is less common than other types of skin cancer, but it’s more likely to grow and spread. While melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer, if it’s caught and treated early, it is usually curable.

Are you eligible to enroll in an APWU Health Plan?

APWU Health Plan has been providing comprehensive healthcare coverage at an affordable price since 1960. The Health Plan is a national preferred provider organization (PPO) that offers both a fee-for-service High Option plan and a Consumer Driven Option plan. Both options are open to most employees and retirees covered under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program.

10 foods that lower blood pressure

High blood pressure affects millions of Americans, but many of us don’t even know we have it. That’s because high blood pressure—also known as hypertension—often has no symptoms. The condition makes your heart work harder than it should and can cause serious problems, including heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure.

Get a personalized plan for achieving your health goals

A Health Risk Assessment is an online program available to all APWU Health Plan members that helps determine your risk for certain health conditions and gives you a personalized plan for achieving your specific health goals. Health Risk Assessments analyze your health-related responses and create a profile with information to put you on a path toward good physical and mental health.

Enroll in a health benefits plan during Open Season

Open Season is the period of time each year when you need to enroll in a health plan for the upcoming year. For postal and federal employees and retirees, the Open Season dates are set by law and run from the Monday of the second full work week in November through the Monday of the second full work week in December.